Rooting a Hudl2 on Windows 8.1 and removing IntelCPHS.log to free up space

Both our kids have Tesco Hudl2 tablets. For the price (if you use ClubCard vouchers it can be about £60) there really isn’t much to compete.

I will admit they are far from perfect, each one has its own problems. The touchscreen is not 100% accurate and will miss maybe 1 in 15 touches, that doesn’t sound much, but it is enough to be frustrating. Occasionally they will not charge despite saying they are charging and the charge light coming on, and they also don’t have much space for apps and media.

When the tablet is new there is about 9GB of space, which isn’t too bad, but add in a couple of games and sync some movies via Plex or Google Movies and suddenly you are running low on space. Luckily there is an SD Card slot which helps out.

The problem we had with one of the tablets though was it was running out of space even if nothing was installed or synced. At first I thought it might be because it was caching a lot of thumbnails from my Google Photos, and other data that was being synced from my Google account. This freed up some space but within a couple of days I was back to the same problem of the device running out of space.

I installed the Disk Usage app, and it showed me that there was 7.5GB taken up in the System Data directory. Unfortunately this is a protected directory and there is no way to see what is in there without the device being rooted. I wasn’t sure if I wanted to do that initially as the process is not as 1-Click as most of the devices I have rooted recently. I decided to hard reset the tablet instead and see what happened. After a couple of weeks of normal use the device was full again and the same directory was showing as having a large amount of data, so this time I took the plunge to discover what the problem was.

To root the device there is an excellent guide on the Modaco forums which I suggest you use. What I will document here is the issues I had following that guide and what I did after successfully rooting the tablet.

The main issue was because my desktop is running Windows 8.1 which causes problems with drivers for the device. It probably doesn’t help that I have installed various different drivers for phones over the last couple of years that is just confusing everything.

I found an updated post within the forum thread which had instructions for how to install if there are driver problems.

How do you know if you have driver problems? If you open up Device Manager and see a device labeled as below, that is a pretty good indication something is wrong:

Wrong Drivers

Wrong Drivers

The solution from the above post is to install PdaNet, which I already had installed, all I needed to do was install the correct drivers, right-click on the device, select Update Driver, then use the manual option to choose from a list:

Select ADB Interface

Select ADB Interface

Google ADB Driver

Google ADB Driver

With the correct driver installed you should see:

Correct Driver Installed

Correct Driver Installed

You should now be able to start the rooting guide and restart the tablet in bootloader mode, at which point you will need to reinstall the drivers for Android Bootloader to allow the Fastboot commands to work:

Bootloader driver

Bootloader driver

Which should then give you the following in Device Manager:

Bootloader device

Bootloader device

From here on you can just follow the rooting tutorial and everything ‘should’ be fine.

Once I had this done I was able to run Disk Usage on the data partition and it showed me that one file was taking up all of the space: IntelCPHS.log.

A quick Google search turned up…..nothing. I seemed to be the only person that had this file on an Android device. As the file was so huge there was no way to open it and find out what was in it, all I could do was to try and delete it. Disk Usage has a delete function, but it wouldn’t work. I couldn’t get ES File Explorer to delete it either. I installed a couple of terminal emulators and they weren’t any help either.

The only way I could find to make it work was to use adb to enter an interactive shell using the following commands (if you are using the tools from the rooting thread then use “adb-windows shell” for the first command, the remainder should be the same):

adb shell

su (Check hudl screen for SuperSu message to grant permissions)

cd data

rm -F IntelCPHS.log

The file was removed and I had all my space back!

After a reboot I found the file had recreated itself, and was 253MB, but it has remained that size now for the last couple of weeks, but I will keep an eye on it.

The one problem with resolving the issue this way is that I am fixing the effect, not the cause. I still don’t know what caused the file to grow so large. I am hoping that in the future if I notice it growing I can pull it off of the device and take a look to see what it is filling up with.